arglblarglwargl:

cocobutterfield:

Do you own a gray cat? If so, you are one step closer to having a cat who looks like Totoro. Simply cut out eyes, a nose, and a tummy piece from paper and put it on the back of a resting kitty. Tada! Instant, adorable Totoro!

Tulip is gray. Do it Moya plsthx.

annabellioncourt:

plz-no:

Simultaneously the worst and best movie ever made

Actually one of my teachers watched every single version of Romeo and Juliet with the original text in front of him to prove that this was the worst version, but to his great dismay its the most accurate film adaptation of it, with the lines closest to the original text and most similar stage direction and relayed emotions.

He proceeded to show it to us in class.

(Source: fuckyeah-chickflicks)

bootyexpress:

THE LAST ONE
bootyexpress:

THE LAST ONE

bootyexpress:

THE LAST ONE

(Source: lauzor)

moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:



can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?
It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.
Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.
Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.
Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.
Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.
The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.
The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.
moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:



can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?
It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.
Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.
Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.
Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.
Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.
The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.
The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.
moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:



can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?
It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.
Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.
Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.
Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.
Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.
The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.
The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.
moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:



can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?
It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.
Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.
Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.
Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.
Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.
The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.
The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.
moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:



can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?
It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.
Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.
Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.
Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.
Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.
The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.
The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.
moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:



can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?
It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.
Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.
Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.
Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.
Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.
The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.
The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.
moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:



can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?
It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.
Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.
Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.
Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.
Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.
The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.
The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.
moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:



can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?
It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.
Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.
Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.
Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.
Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.
The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.
The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.
moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:



can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?
It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.
Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.
Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.
Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.
Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.
The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.
The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.
moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:



can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?
It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.
Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.
Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.
Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.
Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.
The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.
The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.

moonie-couture:

shortylego:

cranialdetritus:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:

can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode?

It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.

Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.

Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.

Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.

Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.

The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.

The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

#Arthur was my childhood jam and really stuff like this is one of the reasons why

There are only a few episodes that I distinctly remember and this one tops the list. My father is a chef and used to do a lot of catering (like Arthur’s dad) at around the age I would watch this. I was actually worried when I saw his dad in the kitchen fire.

It’s actually quite funny this would show up on my dashboard, because I remember the psychologist I saw after the attack made me watch this episode with her, and it kind of made me feel a little better about how to handle my emotions and anxiety after witnessing and losing someone. I watched Arthur a lot with my little brother so it was comforting having characters I was familiar with, going through the same feelings and emotions as me.

liqhtly:

i have two moods:

1. everybody get the fuck away from me

2. someone come over and cuddle and watch movies with me

there is no in between

detailsofpaintings:

Vincent Van Gogh, Cypresses (details) 1889
detailsofpaintings:

Vincent Van Gogh, Cypresses (details) 1889
detailsofpaintings:

Vincent Van Gogh, Cypresses (details) 1889
detailsofpaintings:

Vincent Van Gogh, Cypresses (details) 1889

detailsofpaintings:

Vincent Van Gogh, Cypresses (details) 1889

(Source: kingsleeze)

nuditea:

got no problem with watching a full season of tv in one sitting but when it comes time to pick a movie im like “am i really ready to pay attention to something for two hours”

galehawthorn:

“This world was never meant for one as beautiful as you.” - Don McLean (Starry, Starry Night)

(Source: tessascarstairs)

babygoatsandfriends:

gitchygitchygoomeans:

happyperson023:

gitchygitchygoomeans:

sectumseverus19:

p0king-sm0t:

dolly-kitten:

SCRUB DUB DUB GOAT IN A TUB

How can you not reblog a soapy baby goat

Goats make me laugh because when they make goat noises their tongue goes out.

what do you guys think he is saying?

I think MEEEHHHH

I MEAN IN GOAT LANGUAGE. WHAT DOES MEEEHHHH TRANSLATE TO?

In this situation is means STOP WASHING MY BUTT!!

babygoatsandfriends:

gitchygitchygoomeans:

happyperson023:

gitchygitchygoomeans:

sectumseverus19:

p0king-sm0t:

dolly-kitten:

SCRUB DUB DUB GOAT IN A TUB

How can you not reblog a soapy baby goat

Goats make me laugh because when they make goat noises their tongue goes out.

what do you guys think he is saying?

I think MEEEHHHH

I MEAN IN GOAT LANGUAGE. WHAT DOES MEEEHHHH TRANSLATE TO?

In this situation is means STOP WASHING MY BUTT!!